Laws on teen dating

He has been writing professionally since 2000, has a weekly health and fitness newspaper column in the Cleveland suburbs, reviews for "Youth Worker Journal" and was a featured reporter for the "Kalamazoo Gazette." He holds a Master of Business Administration in adolescent development from Indiana Wesleyan University.Tweens and teens are experiencing disturbing levels of violence in their dating relationships, but only half recognize the warning signs of a dangerous relationship.

A 2008 study commissioned by Liz Claiborne and found: Abuse in a dating relationship can be confusing and frightening at any age.

But for teenagers, who are just beginning to date and develop romantic relationships, this abuse is especially difficult.

At the 2008 Summer Meeting of the National Association of Attorneys General, Attorneys General from across the nation passed a resolution encouraging schools to develop teen dating violence awareness curriculum.

The Washington State Attorney General's office already has a number of resources available to help, including: Schools, parents, teachers, and community organizations all can help identify dating violence and provide support for abuse victims.

The State of Ohio does not have any specific laws that address the general dating relationships of consenting adults.

Likewise, the state doesn't formally define dating nor any form of courtship aside from the union of marriage between a man and a woman.When the abuse is physical or sexual, it can be easy to identify.Emotional abuse is much harder to recognize, but no less damaging.“Some states feel that if have they good child abuse laws, minors are protected,” Gilberg said in a telephone interview.“There’s definitely a lack of awareness about the prevalence of abuse among teens in their relationships.” Break the Cycle contends that all young people over 12 should have the right to petition for protection on their own behalf and that domestic violence protection orders should be available even against abusers who are minors.“If you’re a parent, you want to know if your child is in danger, but on other hand, teens want the anonymity, to not have to tell their parents,” she said.